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RED WINE NEWS



RED WINE FOR HEALTH
THE BENEFITS OF RED WINE

Wine is an alcoholic beverage produced by fermenting crushed grapes using various types of yeast which consume the sugars found in the grapes and convert them into alcohol. This page is dedicated to the health benefits of Red Wines.

Ancient Wine Cellar The production of wine goes back aproximately 8000 years to the Middle eastern area of Iran. It appeared in Europe, via Greece and Rome about 6500 years ago. Now it's grown and enjoyed in most countries of the world. The english word wine is derived from the latin 'vinum'. Most wines contain between 10 and 14 % alcohol.

Chelois grapes Red wine has shown to have very positive health effects. Studies were prompted by what is known as the 'French paradox'. It was found that France had a lower incidence of heart disease even though the french diet is heavy in saturated fats. The french also consume a good amount of wine, which was suspected to lower heart diseases.

It was found in heavy drinkers the risk of heart disease increased, and in light drinkers of wine the risk A GLASS OF RED WINE of heart disease decreased. Also, although white wines were beneficial, red wine was shown to have more benefits to heart health, including cancer protection. Red wine has more polyphenols than white. The chemical resveratrol is also said to be responsible for red wines' health benefits. There are other beneficial compounds in red wine, polyphenols, antioxidants, and flavonoids.

Both red and white wines are effective anti-bacterial agents against strains of Streptococcus, and have traditionally been used to treat wounds in some parts of the world.

So remember as long as you don't over indulge, drink to your health with a glass of red.



Red Wine - The Health Benefits

This is a video of a report by medical editor Marilyn Brooks that first aired Oct. 19, 2007, on WTAE Channel 4 Action News.


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RED WINE - IN THE NEWS

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INGREDIENT IN RED WINE MAY PREVENT SOME BLINDING DISEASES

APR 21, 2010
Resveratrol - found in red wine, grapes, blueberries, peanuts and other plants - stops out of control blood vessel growth in the eye, according to vision researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Rajendra S. Apte MD,PhD
Rajendra S. Apte MD,PhD
The discovery has implications for preserving vision in blinding eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and age related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in Americans over 50.

The formation of new blood vessels, called angiogenesis, also plays a key role in certain cancers and in atherosclerosis. Conducting experiments in mouse retinas, the researchers found that resveratrol can inhibit angiogenesis. Another surprise was the pathway through which resveratrol blocked angiogenesis. The findings are reported in the July issue of the American Journal of Pathology.

"A great deal of research has identified resveratrol as an anti aging compound, and given our interest in age related eye disease, we wanted to find out whether there was a link," says Washington University retina specialist Rajendra S. Apte, MD, PhD, the study's senior investigator. "There were reports on resveratrol's effects on blood vessels in other parts of the body, but there was no evidence that it had any effects within the eye."

The investigators studied mice that develop abnormal blood vessels in the retina after laser treatment. Apte's team found that when the mice were given resveratrol, the abnormal blood vessels began to disappear.

Examining the blood-vessel cells in the laboratory, they identified a pathway - known as a eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2) regulated pathway - that was responsible for the compound's protective effects. That was a surprise because past research involving resveratrol's anti aging effects had implicated a different mechanism that these experiments showed not to be involved.

"We have identified a novel pathway that could become a new target for therapies," Apte says. "And we believe the pathway may be involved both in age related eye disease and in other diseases where angiogenesis plays a destructive role."

Previous research into resveratrol's influence on aging and obesity had identified interactions between the red wine compound and a group of proteins called sirtuins. Those proteins were not related to resveratrol's effects on abnormal blood vessel formation. Instead, the researchers say that in addition to investigating resveratrol as a potential therapy, they also want to look more closely at the eEF2 pathway to determine whether it might provide a new set of targets for therapies, both for eye disease and other problems related to abnormal angiogenesis.

Apte, an assistant professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences and of developmental biology, says because resveratrol is given orally, patients may prefer it to many current treatments for retinal disease, which involve eye injections. The compound also is easily absorbed in the body.

In mice, resveratrol was effective both at preventing new blood vessels and at eliminating abnormal blood vessels that already had begun to develop.

"This could potentially be a preventive therapy in high risk patients," he says. "And because it worked on existing, abnormal blood vessels in the animals, it may be a therapy that can be started after angiogenesis already is causing damage."

Apte stresses that the mouse model of macular degeneration they used is not identical to the disease in human eyes. In addition, the mice received large resveratrol doses, much more than would be found in several bottles of red wine. If resveratrol therapy is tried in people with eye disease, it would need to be given in pill form because of the high doses required, Apte says.

There are three major eye diseases that resveratrol treatment may help: age related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and retinopathy of prematurity. Age related macular degeneration involves the development of abnormal blood vessels beneath the center of the retina. It accounts for more than 40 percent of blindness among the elderly in nursing homes, and as baby boomers get older, the problem is expected to grow, with at least 8 million cases predicted by the year 2020.

In diabetic retinopathy, those blood vessels don't develop beneath the retina. They grow into the retina itself. Diabetic retinopathy causes vision loss in about 20 percent of patients with diabetes. Almost 24 million people have diabetes in the United States alone.

Retinopathy of prematurity occurs when premature babies with immature retinas experience an obstruction in blood flow into the retina. In response, those children often develop abnormal blood vessels that can cause retinal detachment and interfere with vision. Worldwide, that condition blinds 50,000 newborn babies each year.

Apte says the pathway his laboratory has identified may be active not only in those blinding eye diseases, but in cancers and atherosclerosis as well. If so, then one day it might be possible to use resveratrol to improve eyesight and to prevent cardiovascular disease and some types of cancer, too.

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RED WINE AND STROKE

APR 21, 2010
Johns Hopkins researchers discover pathway in mice for resveratrol's apparent protective effect

Researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have discovered the way in which red wine consumption may protect the brain from damage following a stroke.

Sylvain Dore, Ph.D.
Sylvain Dore, Ph.D. -
professor of anesthesiology
and critical care medicine
and pharmacology and
molecular sciences at the
Johns Hopkins University
School of Medicine
Two hours after feeding mice a single modest dose of resveratrol, a compound found in the skins and seeds of red grapes, the scientists induced an ischemic stroke by essentially cutting off blood supply to the animals' brains. They found that the animals that had preventively ingested the resveratrol suffered significantly less brain damage than the ones that had not been given the compound.

Sylvain Dore, Ph.D., an associate professor of anesthesiology and critical care medicine and pharmacology and molecular sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, says his study suggests that resveratrol increases levels of an enzyme (heme oxygenase) already known to shield nerve cells in the brain from damage. When the stroke hits, the brain is ready to protect itself because of elevated enzyme levels. In mice that lacked the enzyme, the study found, resveratrol had no significant protective effect and their brain cells died after a stroke.

"Our study adds to evidence that resveratrol can potentially build brain resistance to ischemic stroke," says Dore, the leader of the study, which appears online in the journal Experimental Neurology.

Red wine has gotten a lot of attention lately for its purported health benefits. Along with reducing stroke, moderate wine consumption has been linked to a lowered incidence of cardiovascular disease — the so-called French paradox. Despite diets high in butter, cheese and other saturated fats, the paradox goes, the French have a relatively low incidence of cardiovascular events, which some have attributed to the regular drinking of red wine.

Dore cautions against taking resveratrol supplements, available alongside vitamins and minerals and on websites touting its benefits, because it is unclear whether such supplements could do harm or good. He has not tested resveratrol in clinical trials. And while resveratrol is found in red grapes, it's the alcohol in the wine that may be needed to concentrate the amounts of the beneficial compound. Dore also cautions that drinking alcohol carries risks along with potential benefits.

He also notes that even if further research affirms the benefits of red wine, no one yet knows how much would be optimal to protect the brain, or even what kind of red wine might be best, because not all types contain the same amount of resveratrol. More research is needed, he says.

Dore says his research suggests that the amount needed could end up being quite small because the suspected beneficial mechanism is indirect. "Resveratrol itself may not be shielding brain cells from free radical damage directly, but instead, resveratrol, and its metabolites, may be prompting the cells to defend themselves," he suggests.

"It's not likely that brain cells can have high enough local levels of resveratrol to be protective," he says. The resveratrol is needed to jump-start this protective enzymatic system that is already present within the cells. "Even a small amount may be sufficient," Dore says.

Dore says his ongoing research also suggests some therapeutic benefits to giving resveratrol to mice after a stroke to limit further neuronal damage.

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A LITTLE WINE BOOSTS OMEGA-3 IN THE BODY

DEC 6, 2008
Researchers find a novel mechanism for a healthier heart. Moderate alcohol intake is associated with higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids in plasma and red blood cells. This is the major finding of the European study IMMIDIET that will be published in the January issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The study suggests that wine does better than other alcoholic drinks. This effect could be ascribed to compounds other than alcohol itself, representing a key to understand the mechanism lying behind the heart protection observed in moderate wine drinkers.

Press release: Catholic University of Campobasso

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RED WINE: HOW IT FIGHTS ALZHEIMER'S

NOV 21, 2008
Scientists call it the "French paradox" - a society that, despite consuming food high in cholesterol and saturated fats, has long had low death rates from heart disease. Research has suggested it is the red wine consumed with all that fatty food that may be beneficial - and not only for cardiovascular health but in warding off certain tumors and even Alzheimer's disease.

Now, Alzheimer's researchers at UCLA, in collaboration with Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in New York, have discovered how red wine may reduce the incidence of the disease. Reporting in the Nov. 21 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, David Teplow, a UCLA professor of neurology, and colleagues show how naturally occurring compounds in red wine called polyphenols block the formation of proteins that build the toxic plaques thought to destroy brain cells, and further, how they reduce the toxicity of existing plaques, thus reducing cognitive deterioration.

Polyphenols comprise a chemical class with more than 8,000 members, many of which are found in high concentrations in wine, tea, nuts, berries, cocoa and various plants. Past research has suggested that such polyphenols may inhibit or prevent the buildup of toxic fibers composed primarily of two proteins - Aß40 and Aß42 - that deposit in the brain and form the plaques which have long been associated with Alzheimer's. Until now, however, no one understood the mechanics of how polyphenols worked.

Teplow's lab has been studying how amyloid beta (Aß) is involved in causing Alzheimer's. In this work, researchers monitored how Aß40 and Aß42 proteins folded up and stuck to each other to produce aggregates that killed nerve cells in mice. They then treated the proteins with a polyphenol compound extracted from grape seeds. They discovered that polyphenols carried a one-two punch: They blocked the formation of the toxic aggregates of Aß and also decreased toxicity when they were combined with Aß before it was added to brain cells.

"What we found is pretty straightforward," Teplow said. "If the Aß proteins can't assemble, toxic aggregates can't form, and thus there is no toxicity. Our work in the laboratory, and Mt. Sinai's Dr. Giulio Pasinetti's work in mice, suggest that administration of the compound to Alzheimer's patients might block the development of these toxic aggregates, prevent disease development and also ameliorate existing disease."

Human clinical trials are next.

"No disease-modifying treatments of Alzheimer's now exist, and initial clinical trials of a number of different candidate drugs have been disappointing," Teplow said. "So we believe that this is an important next step."

UCLA-Press Release

 
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