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HEART VIGOR - HERBS FOR HEALTH

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Warning: Many herbs adversely interact with modern medicines and should only be taken after consulting with medical professionals. Use as directed by a health care provider. Always follow the manufacturers dosage guidelines!



QUASSIA (Quassia excelsa, Picraena excelsa )

Other names for the Quassia tree are Bitter Wood, Bitter Ash, Bois Amer, Lofty Quassia, Amargo, and Picrasma
QUASSIA AMARA The Quassia belongs to the flora genus family of Simaroubaceae, and is native to the tropical regions of America and the Caribbean. The Quassia Excelsa has a thick upright trunk resembling an ash and can grow to 30 meters in height. The Quassia Amara as a smaller version of the tree and has possesses medicinal properties as its larger cousin.

Quassia is readily available healthfood and herbal shops, either shredded, chopped or in liquid form, and has an extremely bitter taste.
The Quassia extracts (quassin) bitter tastes are used to give a bitter flavour to many food products, such as alcoholic bitters and liqueurs, nonalcoholic beverages, desserts, candy, baked goods, and puddings. The Quassia is also used as a hops substitute for making beer.

Benefits and uses:
Quassia contains quassin, alkaloids, scopoletin, and vitamin B1. Some of the quassinoids have cell killing and antileukemic properties. the Quassia herb is useful for to aid snakebite, dysentery, dyspepsia, venereal diseases, rheumatism, alcoholism, intestinal worms and cancer.

Internal use:
-Quassia is effective treating acid ingestion
-is used for treating dysentery
-curing anorexia and loss of appetite
-is useful to treat malaria and other fevers
-it helps the liver, pancreas and intestinal tract in detoxification
-Taken internally It kills roundandworms
-as enema it kills pinworms

External use:
-A cold infusion prepared with one part of the quassia wood to 20 parts of water may be used as an enema for effective results against constipation.
-a Quassia infusion rubbed onto the scalp will kill lice in the hair of children
-as an insecticide in flypaper
-a Quassia infusion sprayed on plants will eliminate small insects and mites
-can be used to ease the symptoms of topically for measles

Quassia Tea:
There are several ways of preparing Quassia for tea, here are 3 of them:

As a cold infusion one teaspoon of Quassia wood or bark left standing overnight in a cup of water becomes a weak brew suitable as a bitter tonic for the stomach.

The Aztec method of making a medicinal brew- Boil 5 to 10 grams of Quassia wood to 1/2 liter of water, let it stand for 12 hours, strain, and then it will be ready to drink. You can drink 1 in the morning and one at bedtime.

A Quassia Tea can also be made using the leaves of Quassia Amara. Infuse it as you would any tea in the standard way.

The tea is also said to destroy a persons appetite for alcohol.
The infusion also serves as a scalp rinse to counteract dandruff.

Quassia can also be taken as a tincture. Use about 1 ml of the tincture prepared with the bark up to three times a day.

Cautions:
Avoid large doses. and if taken in concentrated form as always follow the directions on the label. Quassia is on the FDA's safe list, but should be avoided used during pregnancy or if lactating. Excessive use may also interfere with existing cardiac and anticoagulant drugs.
As always follow the directions on the herbal packaging. Never take Quassia more often than directed.




Warning: Many herbs adversely interact with modern medicines and should only be taken after consulting with medical professionals. Use as directed by a health care provider. Always follow the manufacturers dosage guidelines!




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