Archive for April, 2009

ARTERIAL DISEASE OF THE LEG FREQUENTLY OVERLOOKED IN PATIENTS WITH HEART DISEASE

Tuesday, April 28th, 2009

New York, N.Y. - Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) of the legs, in which the arteries become blocked with plaque and blood supply to the legs is reduced, affects eight million people in the U.S. Early detection of PAD is important because it can limit the ability to walk and exercise, it may place patients at greater risk for limb loss and it increases the chance of having a heart attack or stroke. Coronary artery disease (CAD) is prevalent in patients with PAD and it is known that PAD is under diagnosed in the primary care setting, but a new study found that it is often overlooked even in patients with known heart disease who are under a cardiologist’s care. The study was published in the May issue of Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, the official journal of The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI). Led by Dr. Issam D. Moussa of New York Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, the study involved nearly 800 patients with ischemic heart disease who were to undergo coronary angiography and/or intervention and were either at least 70 years old, or between the ages of 50 and 69 and had a history of diabetes mellitus and/or tobacco use. Researchers determined if patients had PAD by calculating the Ankle-Brachial Index, the ratio of the blood pressure in the lower legs to blood pressure in the arms, which is normally the first test administered to patients in cases where PAD is suspected. Patients also answered questionnaires on PAD awareness and functional status.

>>>>>Read the full press release in our HeartVigor.com News Page

MOLECULE PROMTS DAMAGED HEART CELLS TO REPAIR THEMSELVES AFTER A HEART ATTACK

Saturday, April 11th, 2009

DALLAS - A protein that the heart produces during its early development reactivates the embryonic coronary developmental program and initiates migration of heart cells and blood vessel growth after a heart attack, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found.

The molecule, Thymosin beta-4 (TB4), is expressed by embryos during the heart’s development and encourages migration of heart cells. The new findings in mice suggest that introducing TB4 systemically after a heart attack encourages new growth and repair of heart cells. The research findings indicate that the molecule affects developmental gene expression as early as 24 hours after systemic injection. The UT Southwestern study is online and will appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology.

“This molecule has the potential to reprogram cells in the body to get them to do what you want them to do,” said Dr. J. Michael DiMaio, associate professor of cardiothoracic surgery at UT Southwestern and senior author of the study. “Obviously, the clinical implications of this are enormous because of the potential to reverse damage inflicted on heart cells after a heart attack.”

>>>>>Read the full Press Release in our HeartVigor.com News Page.

NEW NON ANTIBIOTIC DRUGS TO COUNTER HOSPITAL INFECTIONS

Friday, April 10th, 2009

‘Red Death’ provides clues about how the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa attacks host.

Lack of an adequate amount of the mineral phosphate can turn a common bacterium into a killer, according to research to be published in the April 14, 2009, issue of the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science. The findings could lead to new drugs that would disarm the increasingly antibiotic-resistant pathogen rather than attempting to kill it.

 Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most serious hospital-acquired pathogens. A common cause of lung infections, it is also found in the intestinal tract of 20 percent of all Americans and 50 percent of hospitalized patients in the United States.

It is one of the hundreds of bacteria that colonize the human intestinal tract, usually causing no apparent harm. It might even be beneficial to its host. Once the host is weakened by an illness, surgical procedure or immunosuppressive drugs, however, P. aeruginosa can cause infection, inflammation, sepsis and death.

Why P. aeruginosa can suddenly turn on its host has eluded researchers - until now. Scientists have long known that after an operation or organ surgery, levels of inorganic phosphate fall. The authors of the PNAS paper, led by scientists at the University of Chicago, hypothesized that phosphate depletion in the stressed intestinal tract signals P. aeruginosa to become lethal.

“These findings provide novel insight into the mechanisms by which P. aeruginosa is able to shift from indolent colonizer to a lethal pathogen when present in the intestinal tract of a stressed host,” said Alexander Zaborin, lead author of the study and a research professional at the University of Chicago’s Department of Surgery.

>>>>>Read on in our HeartVigor.com News Page.

OLIVE LEAF EXTRACT FOR HEALTH

Friday, April 10th, 2009

Olive Leaf Extract is made from the leaves of the olive tree. The leaves are the main part used in extracting the herbal medicine. The olive tree belongs to the family Oleaceae and is native to the Metiteranian areas of Asia Minor and Syria.
Olive Leaf use as a herbal remedy dates back to ancient Greece. Hippocrates prescribed olive oil for many ailments including ulcers.
Olive Leaf It was around 1900 that the secoiridoid compound oleuropein was isolated from the Olive Leaf, and Olive Leaf Extract came into use in modern society. Since then other secoiridoids, ligustroside and oleacein have been found in the Olive Leaf. They also contain the triterpenoids oleanolic acid and uvaol. As well as the flavonoids chrysoeriol, apigenin, luteolin glycosides, quercitin and kaempferol.
This herbal extract is loaded with sterols and antioxidants.

>>>>>Read on in our HeartVigor.com Herbal Page in the Diet section.

SOURCE OF MAJOR HEALTH BENEFITS IN OLIVE OIL REVEALED

Thursday, April 2nd, 2009

Scientists have pinned down the constituent of olive oil that gives greatest protection from heart attack and stroke. In a study of the major antioxidants in olive oil, Portuguese researchers showed that one, DHPEA-EDA, protects red blood cells from damage more than any other part of olive oil. “These findings provide the scientific basis for the clear health benefits that have been seen in people who have olive oil in their diet,” says lead researcher Fatima Paiva-Martins, who works at the University of Porto.

Heart disease is caused partly by reactive oxygen, including free radicals, acting on LDL or “bad” cholesterol and resulting in hardening of the arteries. Red blood cells are particularly susceptible to oxidative damage because they are the body’s oxygen carriers.

Read the full News Release in our HeartVigor.com News Page.